BAFTS Annual Conference PROGRAMME 20/21 May 2018 London

BAFTS ANNUAL CONFERENCE Westbourne Grove Church London W11 2RW

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FULL PROGRAMME* (14/5/2018) *subject to change 

Sunday timetable 20th May 2018

BAFTS print COnf document 2018

9am -10.30am STALLS ARRIVE AND SET-UP 0nly come this early if Board/guest/ setting up stalls

  1. Zuza Trading SUNDAY and MONDAY
  2. Just Trade UK Ltd SUNDAY and MONDAY
  3. Koseli Wholesale SUNDAY only
  4. AURA QUE SUNDAY and MONDAY
  5. LovethatStuff SUNDAY and MONDAY
  6. Traidcraft SUNDAY and MONDAY
  7. Shared Interest (visitor) SUNDAY and MONDAY
  8. Red Tribe SUNDAY and MONDAY
  9. Enfair SUNDAY and MONDAY
  10. Achkiy (former member) SUNDAY and MONDAY

10.30 – 11.30 General member and guest arrival

Coffee, tea & supplier stall browsing

11.30-11.40 Official welcome; Order of the day/notices

LAURA CAVE, Board member, and Kathryn Sygrove, Executive Officer

11.40-12.45 Supplier stories

1) 11.40-11.55 Koseli Wholesale (Lynn Mold re fusion with EET)

2) 11.55-12.10 Zuza Trading (Claire Shepherd)

3) 12.10-12.25 AURA QUE, Laura Queening

4) 12.25-12.40 Gateway World Shop, Hazel Dobson

12.45-13.45 Lunch break

13.45-14.30 SPEAKER 1 Safia Minney, Founder and Former CEO of People Tree and now MD of Po-Zu shoes ‘Is Fair Trade the Answer to the Sustainable Development Goals?’

14.30-15.10 SPEAKER 2 Sian Conway, Ethical Hour “Know your audience: how to maximise use of social media platforms for your ethical business”

15.10-15.40 Tea and coffee break

15.40-16.45 CHOOSE ONE OF TWO WORKSHOPS:

Workshop 1: Gender and Fair Trade: The Story of Women Cocoa Farmers in Fair Trade short film (17 mins) produced by Dr Roy Maconachie, Bath University, Centre for Development Studies (CDS) about time inequalities and other prejudices against Ghanaian women who do all the chores, cooking, gathering, sorting children and a lot of the farming but often cannot afford their own land. Facilitator: Sabita Banerji, Chair of Oxford Fair Trade Coalition.

OR: Workshop 2: Laura Cave: The real cost of Fair Trade? What makes fair trade stand out/ differing basic costs in different countries

16.45- 17.45 Informal time for networking & browsing stalls PLUS:

Book in for 10 minute slots with Board members or Guest Speakers on subjects such as Social Media, Importing Issues, Product Design and Development. Book first come first served on the day.

18.00-19.00 Peruvian Evening meal – advise of any food requirements before 13 May.

19.00-21.00 and beyond…Entertainment  – a variety of activities

 

Monday 21st May 2018 CONFERENCE/AGM PROGRAMME

9.00 – 10.00 Supplier stalls open, tea, coffee & informal networking

Exhibiting stalls: Zuza Trading , Just Trade UK Ltd , Holy Lama (Spice Drops) , AURA QUE, Barb Wilson (LovethatStuff), Traidcraft , Where Does It Come From?, St. Nicolas, Shared Interest (visitor), Red Tribe, Achkiy (former member).

10.00 – 11.00 five supplier stories :

10.00 -10.12 Siesta Crafts, Jo Harper

10.12 -10.24 St Nicolas, Clare Ronai

10.24 -10.36 LovethatStuff, Barb Wilson

10.36 -10.48 Holy Lama Spice Drops, Gouri Kubair

10.48 -11.00 Where Does It Come From? Jo Salter

 11.00 – 11.30 Tea and stalls

11.30 – 12.15 SPEAKER 3: Traidcraft Exchange, EMILIE SCHULTZE, Campaigns Officer “Tea and post-Brexit Trade”

New tea supply chain campaign plus quick Brexit update

12.15 – 12.45 Jo Bega, CEO, Child Rescue Nepal – “How can a bowl of rice keep a child safe from traffickers?

12.45 – 13.30 Lunch

AND: 12.45-13.30 (over lunch) Shop drop-in session/ brainstorm in separate space with Panel members

13.30 -14.15  Josh Pitts, Co-Owner Equal Exchange UK : Our story and non-certification journey

14.15 – 15.00 Discussion on Resolutions

15.00 AGM

16.30 close / welcome any new Board members    

 

 

Posted in Fair Trade

KERALA CRAFTS (Christine Snow) WRITES on “KUDUMBASHREE initiative in Kerala, India

A few years ago I heard about something called Kudumbashree which I discovered was a movement unique to Kerala; an anti-poverty and gender equality movement for women.  I thought that it would be helpful to write about this initiative given that Kerala Crafts was also set up to give women employment and empowerment.

Kudumbashree means ‘prosperity of the family’ and will shortly be celebrating its 20th birthday.  It is built around 3 critical components – micro credit, entrepreneurship and empowerment.  To be poor, from a low caste and a woman, is a triple blow in Kerala.  This scheme is to help women such as these, to move forward and upwards in life.  This incredible movement takes some unpacking!

who can join Kud.

Kerala Crafts has been supporting the ladies of Kudumbashree through its purchases of handloom aprons, oven gloves and tea towels, and more recently, umbrellas (Kerala is the ‘umbrella capital’ of India – probably because it has 2 monsoons!)

Who can join Kudumbashree?

Poverty manifests in various ways, not simply regarding the lack of income.  Kudumbashree members are not identified only by absolute poverty or income levels.

At present, 3.5 million poor women participate in the Kudumbashree movement, which cuts across political ideologies and religious faiths.  This government aided programme works to give poor women equal opportunities in all areas of life that will empower them socially, economically and politically.

Kudumbashree logo 1Kudumbashree units are formed throughout neighbourhoods and groups comprising of no more than 20 women, form the backbone of Kudumbashree.   Signing up to join the Kudumbashree scheme, means that the women must attend weekly meetings which are held in the homes of members, where schemes and other issues are discussed.  The meetings also give the women a chance to socialise, and this makes them more confident about themselves and also ensures a steady income.

K women at a neighbourhood group meeting

“More than anything, it has liberated women to get out of the house and go to work.  In a traditionally male-dominated society – women participating in regimes, going to vocational training programmes and starting small businesses was not the norm.  Kudumbashree has helped to change this” states K.J. Sohan, former mayor of Kochi.

Micro finance is one of the most important functions of the scheme to alleviate poverty at grass roots level.  It operates various activities including a thrift and credit programme.   At the weekly meetings all members bring their thrift or savings, which can be as low as Rs10 (12p).  “The idea behind small savings is to encourage women, even those below the poverty line, to save.  Savings are collected and recycled in the system by way of sanctioning loans” says Priya Paul, project manager with Kudumbashree for more than 10 years.

Each neighbourhood group opens a joint account in a local bank, while each participant is given a separate pass book.  Once trained to make simple banking transactions, these women become more empowered.  Once savings are generated, heavily subsidised loans are granted.

These units can apply for loans either as a group or as an individual, from the panchayat (village based form of self-government) in rural areas, or the corporation in urban areas.  With the loan, the women are able to start up small-scale businesses, and they are eligible for subsidies too.  If they borrow 100,000 rupees (£1,140) they only have to repay 80,000 (£911) over a 2-3 year period.

 Some of the units that have formed small businesses have made their way up the ladder and are doing well.  They initially started with soap making, agarbathi (incense sticks) and washing powder etc.   This has now led to an extensive involvement in the food business in Kerala.  Snacks, pickles, curry powders and handicrafts are now widely available at fairs, festivals and stalls, and also through the local value chain ‘Homeshop’, set up in 2015 and now has stores in 200 village locations, providing self-employment to more than 400 producers and 1200 women.

Kudumbashree a

Kudumbashree has many strings to its bow, and these are some of the successful enterprises firmly established by Kudumbashree, embracing local, economic and social development and women empowerment:

  1. Santhwanam – detection and health checks, before hospital treatment may be necessary.
  2. Amrutham Food Supplement – nutritional food supplement provided at rural mother and child care centres for children aged 6 months – 3 years.
  3. Cafe Kudumbashree – specialising in Kerala cuisine, through food festivals, catering orders and canteens.
  4. Kudumbashree Travel – addressing concerns about safe travel for women and children, especially at unsociable times. It provides a professional taxi service with vehicles bearing the Kudumbashree logo, which makes it easily identifiable. The newly operational Kochi Metro, the 8th city to get a metro rail, is employing a workforce of 1,000 women to work in the 18 Kochi metro stations.  This makes it the first all-women run metro in the world.  The jobs include 7 women train operators as well as ticketing, customer relations, housekeeping,  parking management and running canteens.kochi metro women
  5. Kudumbashree Wellness Centres – evolved from the Santhwanam scheme (above 1.) The centres house modern equipment and holds classes on health issues and cookery classes.
  6. Kudumbashree Women Construction Teams – maximising the skills of women labourers in new technologies and emerging standards in the construction industry – this project is being piloted in

Ernakulam (Kochi).  Based on its success, it will be replicated in other cities.

  1. Farming Initiatives – increasing the visibility of women in agriculture, reducing drudgery and providing a livelihood opportunity by adopting sustainable and eco friendly agriculture.  Agriculture is perhaps Kudumbashree ‘s most successful endeavour, most probably due to Kerala’s fertile soil.    Not only has the project increased agricultural production, but it has also brought considerable fallow land back under cultivation and financially empowered thousands of women.  Currently, through consumer pressure, the provision of organic milk and poultry is being seriously looked into, which will be a great improvement.   The fresh milk and fresh chicken now provided from neighbouring state, Tamil Nadu is poor quality.agric has been one of K most successful stories

A family of 5 in Kerala (Land of Coconuts), consumes at least one coconut every day either in the form of oil, pulp or milk.  Kerala has 180 million coconut trees, but an acute shortage of climbers.  Ideally, coconuts have to be harvested every 45 days, which calls for at least 50,000 climbers for the trees, according to Kerala’s Economics & Statistics Department data.

Several years ago, the state realised that by opening up the job market to women, this would go some way to solving the problem.  Women from districts like Kozikode, Thrissur and Malappuram were trained to climb the trees with the help of a device and also given subsidised 2 wheelers and mobiles.  These devices prevent chest pains and scars usually associated with climbing trees.

Many women in the district can now earn up to Rs650 (£7.70) a day by climbing coconut trees, something no-one would have imagined possible just a few decades ago.

  1. Asraya – rehabilitation of destitute women with full support of local self-governance structures. This provides destitute families with food, housing, drinking water, sanitation, health care and clothing.

Part of this programme is BUDS – schools for children with special needs, where there is no discrimination.  There are now 63 of these schools in Kerala.

  1. Balasabha – specialised work with children to prevent inter-generational transmission of poverty.
  2. Tribal Development – bringing marginalised tribals under the aegis of the Kudumbashree network to provide them with facilities currently less accessible or denied.

In the past 10 years 106,162 tribal families have benefitted from this project.rangasree

  1. Rangasree – a programme to train selected women from Kudumbashree Theatre, with the aim of establishing community theatres in the state to promote awareness of social justice and equality.
  2. Anti-human trafficking – this is the 3rd largest organised crime in Kerala. Human trafficking caters to flesh trade, forced labour and illegal organ transplantation.  Preventative and rehabilitative interventions aiming to equip the victims, escapees and survivors, and to identify high risk groups are in operation.
  3. Nirbhaya – helping to prevent sexual violence against women and children, and to also prevent child abuse and sex-trafficking through accessible help-desks and counselling.
  4. KAASSKudumbashree accounts and audit service society; a home grown enterprise to ensure proper account keeping in the community network.

In addition to all these initiatives, I read this in the newspaper whilst in Kerala recently – so one more thing to add!

Stop press:  The Hindu 14.1.18

“Vigilant groups to be extended to all wards.

 In its latest move for the protection of women and children, vigilant groups constituted by Kudumbashree mission will be extended to all wards in the state.  Of the nearly 20,000 wards in Kerala the vigilant groups have been constituted in 15,000 wards.   An activity group will ensure immediate intervention to prevent violence against women and children.  Each vigilant ward group will have 5-10 members forming part of a national mission for empowerment of women with support from the social justice department and Janmaithri police*……………..”

            *Pink Beat is a Kerala initiative by the state  police department that will encourage women to seek help

    rather than be reluctant to approach a male officer.  It has been set up for enhancing the safety

    of women and children in public places.  Patrols will be present at bus stops, schools, colleges etc.

Their role is to:   a) ensure reserved seats on public transport for women and the physically challenged are not

misused by the general public  b) shut down any avenue of eve-teasing or molestation threats.    c)  assist children and passengers with physical disabilities to reach their destination.

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Critics of Kudumbashree say it needs to consolidate its strengths and work on its weaknesses, but the impressive list above, shows there is definitely a bright future for properly managed Kudumbashree units.

Kerala Crafts is currently establishing a link with Marari, a company owned by Kudumbashree Neighbourhood Groups  – a social enterprise established in 2003 to support rural women in Kerala.  They make food products,

beverages, hygiene products and umbrellas.

www.keralacrafts.co.uk

Posted in Fair Trade

A POTTED HISTORY OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

This year, in 2018, International Women’s Day falls on Thursday 8th March, towards the end of Fairtrade Fortnight (26 February-11 March with the title “Come On In To Fairtrade”). Let’s take a look at how this inspiring annual event started off!

The 2018 topic is #Pressforprogress and focuses on working towards gender parity for women. The World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Gender Gap Report suggests that gender parity is over 200 years away, and the need for progress is as strong as ever. International Women’s Day belongs to all groups collectively, whether women from companies, charities, educational institutions, associations, government and more, and is celebrated by worldwide events and awareness raising whether this is through a Conference, a community gathering, a coffee morning or a chat.

The first IWD was in 1911 and started by the Suffragettes. It has always been a global day to celebrate the social, cultural and political achievements of women and to promote gender parity. Over 1oo years later, it is still a powerful platform with a unifying drive for action. The colours linked with it have varied over time (this year the key colour is ultra violet) and have been linked with those of the Women’s Social and Political Union UK 1908: purple stood for justice and dignity; green for hope; white for purity  – although this is now considered a controversial concept – and yellow for a new dawn.

The values that have guided and continue to guide the movement have a lot in common with The World Fair Trade Organisation 6th Fair Trade Principle which promotes “No discrimination, gender equity and freedom of association”. They are: justice, dignity, hope, equality, collaboration, tenacity, appreciation, respect, empathy, and forgiveness. Let’s see plenty of that in evidence in events on IWD this coming 8th March 2018!

Early C20th Hammersmith WSPU banner with colours green, white and purple

Early C20th Hammersmith WSPU banner with colours green, white and purple

Posted in Fair Trade

TARA PROJECTS – visit by Hazel Dobson and Rachel Farey November 2017

In November 2017, Hazel Dobson, Manager of Gateway World Shop in Durham, went to the WFTO Biennial Conference in Delhi, and teamed up with Rachel Farey of One World Shop, who was also representing the Scottish Fair Trade Forum. Before the actual Conference took place, they visited several producers, one of which was Tara Projects, a WFTO Guaranteed Member organisation. Here I have condensed some information from Tara’s latest Newsletter to provide you with more information on how they operate as a fair trade concern.

TARA supports many capacity-building programs, such as producer workshops; raising awareness of hygiene with members of the community who suffer from cerebral palsy and disabilities; exploring fair marketing opportunities to support small farmers, and they too attended and helped co-organise the WFTO Biennial Conference with the Fair Trade fraternity in India.

You may (or may not) know that TARA projects stands for Trade Alternative Reform Action Projects, www.taraprojects.com whose mission according to its website is as follows:

“…to practice fairness in its production and trading activities for the development of the grassroots and the other marginalised sections of society, using capacity building towards continuously improving its performance while ensuring social equity and environmental sustainability. It is committed to following the fair trade standards developed by WFTO.”

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It works with such producer groups as “Mahila Vikas Samooh” (see  image to the left from TARA website) a women’s Development Group in Bawana, New Delhi. TARA projects initiated a livelihood generation programme and a tailoring centre for the young women in the slum community, plus a free tuition centre for underprivileged children. Due to the government polices, the slums had been demolished and, regarding a relocation of the people, 18 yards of land were given to each slum dweller on the out skirts of the city. The women now produce artificial jewellery. Over time the organization provided further training in designing to improve the skills of the artisans and therefore the quality of the products. The group started with seven women. Now it has reached nineteen women, who work jointly in the direction of economic empowerment. Today are more aware and economically better off than before.

TAJA-8-42-800x500They also work with producer group Taja 8, in Pataudi, Haryana, where beadwork is again produced (see image above, right from TARA website). Pataudi is a small town in the state of Haryana. It is 60 kilometres away from the west of Delhi. Before the English came, the town was ruled by the feudal ruler family of Nawab of Pataudi. During those times he ruled 52 villages surrounding Pataudi town.

He also built his palace there.  The times changed and the rulers lost their power, glory and territory. But the name of Pataudi still remains. The population of Pataudi consists of both Muslims and Hindu communities. They have always lived in peace here. The Nawab still owns agricultural land in Pataudi and the area around, and lends the land to very small farmers on Ugahi (yearly contract basis).

Posted in Uncategorized

Dundee Ethical Christmas Fair Caird Hall Official Launch 5th Dec 2017

DUNDEE ETHICAL CHRISTMAS FAIR 4-23 DECEMBER CAIRD HALL BY HAND UP EVENTS

This is the second year that Kathryn has been invited to speak at the Official Launch of the Dundee Ethical Christmas Fair, invited by Tania Pramschufer, Director of Hand Up Events www.handupevents.co.uk This Edinburgh-based concern is a social action events company, which creates positive cultural exchange events such as markets, fashion shows, conferences and festivals. Their largest area of work is supporting fair and ethical trade, in well-attended locations, which attract exhibitors from across the globe. Kathryn has so far represented BAFTS visiting their Ethical and Fair Trade stalls on the (Edinburgh) Fringe in the Summer of 2016, at their 2016 Ethical Christmas Fair Official Launch, and at their FASHIONable event timed to coincide with World Fair Trade Day 2017 alongside able-bodied and less-able bodied models showing off fair trade, local, upcycled and ethical fashion at its best!

Once again she was thrilled to head up to Dundee to participate in an event showcasing a wonderfully eclectic mixture of stalls, both local, ethical, national, international, and fair trade, and including some BAFTS members such as Lumina Jewellery, Zuri Design, and Blue Llama (regular attendees). Others who exhibited were Fair Trade Scotland with sumptuous fair trade tartan produced in Cambodia by WFTO producers, regular visitors from abroad such as Dorostel International, and Sanyo Crafts, from Kenya; local food stalls, local artists and craftspeople, Dundee Fair trade Forum, and a wide selection of gin sellers!

This year we also had the good fortune of having Fair trade ambassador and prominent TV presenter/ journalist Gail Porter attending the Launch, alongside the Lord Provost; Lou Marshall, female piper extraordinaire; and erstwhile brickie turned internationally renowned Scottish tenor Martin Aelred, who is the Dalai Lama’s favourite opera singer. Martin Rhodes from the Scottish Fair Trade Forum stayed a few hours, Sarah Craig, Dundee’s City Markets Manager was in attendance; Tania’s assistant Olga, Tommy the photographer and two sets of TV cameras! It was an honour to be able to represent BAFTS alongside such celebrities and key fair trade supporters. (Below pic L to R Scottish Piper Lou Marshall, Gail Porter, Sarah Craig, Dundee City markets Manager, Kathryn, BAFTS’ Executive Officer).

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Bang on 12 noon, the Launch started with singing and piping in front of the Marquis, then we paraded in with Santa, and Tania officially opened the event, welcoming dignitaries and supporters, followed by Gail Porter enthusing and delighting the crowd; Dundee City Council representatives explaining their involvement and commitment; Martin Rhodes from Scottish Fair Trade Forum, Eve Broadis from Fair Trade Scotland, and myself, all introducing ourselves and the organisations or businesses which we represented. Martin Aelred serenaded the crowd which of course went down wonderfully to round off the opening celebrations. Then there were lots of photographs and camera crews ready to talk to Tania who was delighted with the media coverage.

There was an opportunity to talk to current BAFTS members and ask what we could continue doing for them, and look for potential new members, whilst allowing shoppers to browse freely. There are quite a few stalls which have some fair trade lines, some organic, some ethical and so it provides an opportunity to chat and find out more about some other businesses and their stock. The event was well attended for the Launch and hopefully will continue to be until it finishes on 23rd December. For more information go to the website above under the header “Dundee Christmas Market”. This wonderful short video from Ethical TV sums up the festive atmosphere on the Launch day!

Posted in Fair Trade

Abergavenny Shared Learning Event with Fair Trade Wales & Hub Cymru Africa

BAFTS, FAIR TRADE WALES AND HUB CMYRU AFRICA: SHARED LEARNING EVENT SEP 12 2017 ABERGAVENNY

I attended this afternoon event, having been invited to speak on behalf of BAFTS by Aileen Burmeister, Programme Manager at Fair Trade Wales, and Liz Rees, Grants Support Officer from Hub Cymru Africa. Aileen joined Fair Trade Wales after three years in the third sector, working on Wales-wide projects and events for Citizens Advice Cymru. Since completing her degree in International Politics, Aileen has been involved with two local Fair Trade groups in Wales, in Aberystwyth and Cardiff, with an understanding of different groups and geographies in Wales. Liz deals with Hub Cymru Africa’s grants scheme which enables individuals, community groups and organisations throughout Wales to access funding for small-scale Wales-Africa projects. Up to £180,000 is available per year, including an annual minimum of £50,000 for health activities involving the Welsh NHS or Public Health Wales. Funding is allocated under four thematic areas: Health, Sustainable Livelihoods, Lifelong Learning, Climate Change and Environment. The invited participants were Eighteen Rabbit, Fair Dos, Ananuca, Tools For Africa, Love Zimbabwe, and Sarah’s Coffee and the event was held at Abergavenny Community Centre.

The purpose of the event was to invite representatives from groups and organisations (mainly fair trade shops, suppliers or trading arms of charities) to look at how best to support fair trade producers. Three of the organisations represented were BAFTS members, and the other three were not. One of those did not currently use fairly-traded products but was hoping to. The main aims of the event were to bring together organisations and businesses based in Wales, and (wanting to be) involved in fair trade, plus better understanding of fair trade, and networking. The image below shows (L to R) Liz Rees, myself, and Aileen Burmeister in the Abergavenny Community Centre setting up for the event.

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After an initial introduction, I spoke about BAFTS, what we do and offer as a membership organisation, explained the differences between fair trade versus FAIRTRADE, and conventional trade, then looked at some of the challenges currently facing both wholesalers and retailers – Brexit, increased exchange rates, the costs of suppliers being passed on to a degree to shops, and therefore shops’ customers, plus the challenging nature of high street retail. I then expanded on some adaptations in light of the current climate which BAFTS has made as a result eg accepting a wider bracket of fair trade certifications used by suppliers which serve our shops, and which we feel are equally rigorous but offer flexibility for members and applicants; and reducing the percentage of fairly-traded goods required by our shops to 60% which is still fully in line with the criteria laid down by WFTO, of which BAFTS is a member. We of course keep a close eye of the remaining percentage to ensure that diversity into eg environmental, green or local products is still appropriate.

Eighteen Rabbit (below) then spoke on product design, and explained that they were a business, not a not-for-profit organisation like many of the other attendees, and that they were based in Hay-on-Wye. As a fair trade retailer, they felt that unique products, packaging and presentation were key – such as their animals made from flip flops, although others questioned whether the use of packaging, either at all or if it wasn’t fairly-traded, was appropriate plus raised the difficult question of the poor reputation of some courier companies and how that should be approached if we are aiming to show fairness towards workers in UK businesses too. Many felt that educating artisans on designs eg animals they had never seen, such as dragons and badgers, could be tricky and did sometimes lead to quality control issues.

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Martha from BAFTS’ member organisation Love Zimbabwe was keen to promote the 11th Wales Fair Trade Festival which took place on 7/8th October. She stated that she had started as a charity initially, and struggled to find places to sell her goods. She goes into schools and finds that school fairs are good places to sell her products. Glastonbury had not worked for her. She goes for ethically-minded markets, where products from Zimbabwe tend to sell themselves. She is so relieved personally to have had the chance to come out of poverty that fair trade is close to her heart. There is no internet or markets there. She has had students experience the poverty in Zimbabwe first hand, so they can now be her voice piece and do talks on the producers. When she travels back to Zimbabwe, the places she goes to can be violent and risky. Changing lives can be hard, as she often buys goods out of pity, whilst not being certain if they will actually sell.

Liz from Hub Cmyru Africa talked about future proofing organisations to minimise the effects of shocks and stresses in future events. Sustainable organisations needed clear goals, succession planning, clear monitoring and evaluation systems, compliance with national and local regulations, strong partnerships and they need to engage with the community, plus employ a full range of markets. Strong partnerships need to be collaborative with mutual understanding, trust, equality and with a specific goal. Community ownership must be ongoing, cumulative, and enable all to participate, not just the leaders, Succession planning needs to be implemented early, with shared responsibility and tasks, key skills, and look forward with new strategies.

Networking revolved around mainly looking at setting up a Wales Fair Trade Regional Network including both BAFTS and non-BAFTS members to help shops share ideas in difficult times.

Posted in Fair Trade

Write-up of Future Learn course “Who Made My Clothes” over three weeks

The PDF version of this article written by Kathryn is Who Made My Clothes three week complete writeup The free three week course was run by Future Learn with lots of support materials from Fashion Revolution and was facilitated by Course managers from the University of Exeter.

 

Posted in Fair Trade

Meeting Namaste supplier from Kathmandu, Nepal

Namaste’s Open Week gave me the chance to meet Jhaindra Ghimire, Owner of a Nepalese fair trade garment and accessories business based in Kathmandu. Jhaindra has a University education and an MBA. His business joined Fair Trade Group Nepal as he wanted it to not just be for profit, but also to have a social purpose and there were like-minded organisations in this group (currently 21 members). Having the chance to talk to him opened my eyes to the caste system in Nepal and to the many hardships which some people are likely to endure. He explained that a lot of rebuilding had taken place in Kathmandu after the 2015 earthquakes, but not in the outlying areas. His own factory had collapsed but he had managed to sort some makeshift cover for his employees in the short term.

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Namaste helped this supplier in its first few years in business with an interest-free loan of £20,000 to rent a workshop and buy machinery. Jhaindra now employs around 110 people, of which about 70 are Kamalaries, ie young women originally sold at the age of 6 or 7 to richer families as slaves, and originating from one of the lower castes, that of the Tharu who inhabit the mid- Western area of Nepal. These people tend to be honest, hard working, subsistence farmers, but can never afford to earn enough to keep their families or provide them with an education. Jhaindra told of how some of these girls needed rescuing by an NGO, the Friends of Needy Children, itself quite a dangerous task, as bonded labour is now illegal in Nepal, but the families will have paid the parents for the arrangement and will not have expected them to be taken away.

His employees receive much more than the minimum wage of about £80 (8100 Nepalese rupees) per month set by the government and Labour Unions, and receive training to help them progress through tasks. They also get 52 days’ holidays, bonuses, sick leave, and are provided with their uniform. There are also scholarship programmes for workers’ children and other social welfare programmes such as economic support to orphanages.

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Kamalari girls are often involved in sewing, earning about double the minimum wage, although this task has posed problems at times with labelling, as they arrive illiterate and do not understand the wording used. Jhaindra explained that he has workers who sew, stitch, pack, process, pattern cutters who are very precise and are paid the most (up to 55,000 Nepalese rupees), and teachers who pass on skills and training.

When some of the Kamalari girls were rescued and returned to their families, trainers went to teach them skills to enable them to start employment. Jhaindra visited their families who spoke of the differences this had made to their lives. The girls are now housed in dormitories near the workplace. Jhaindra explained that there are four main castes in Nepal: Brahmin (educated classes), Kshatriya (fighters), Vaishya (workers), and Sudra (manual workers). Generally speaking, castes marry into their own caste, but attitudes are changing. Certain roles, and jobs are expected of certain castes. At times he himself is surprised at what some of the Kamalari girls can achieve with the correct training.

Of his fair trade business, Jhaindra stated: “I want to illustrate that our main aim, as well as running on a profit basis, is to extend our maximum effort to accommodating mainly the economically marginalized people by providing them with extra support, which may increase their quality of life”. Personally I cannot think of a better way to sum up what fair trade is meant to embody.

Posted in Fair Trade

BAFTS Annual Conference 21/22 May Priory Street Centre York – a brief version

It is getting on towards three weeks since we held our Annual Conference in the Priory Street Centre York and in all fairness it was probably our best to date. A lot of hard work had gone into ensuring a balance of speakers, workshops, resolutions, and evening entertainment, with something for our retailers, suppliers and visitors.

The Saturday afternoon was busy with getting rooms set up as far as possible, and Sunday morning started with getting the layout right, checking equipment, deciding which workshops would be where, and welcoming attendees for the start at 11.30am. Following an introduction from outgoing Chair, Joanna Pollard, we started with browsing stalls from about a dozen suppliers, and heard three moving accounts of supplier stories from Just Trade (UK) Ltd, York Scarves and Fair Grounds, then a video from Goodweave which had specially been shaped for our Conference. After lunch we heard from Heather Masoud (Zaytoun) about how fair trade is helping producers and farmers in Palestine; from Carol Wills about various types of certification including the WFTO Guarantee System; and went on to split into three workshops on different topics – Window and shop display for retailers, Monitoring your Suppliers, and Importing from Africa, all held by different members of BAFTS. More supplier stall browsing, networking followed, then an evening meal and a quiz, bingo and  a relaxed evening.

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DAbtjCoXgAAqwLhThe Monday started with more stall browsing, another four moving and important supplier talks on how they are helping improve producers’ lives -from Zuza Trading, Enfair, Neema Crafts, and Picaflor. This was followed by a much-awaited talk from Emilie Schultze of Traidcraft about the effect of Brexit on producers across the developing world; then we heard from Amanda Galliano, Business Development Manager at Liberation Nuts on their progress as a Fair Trade Company.

Lunch was followed by an excellent talk by Bruce Crowther on Grassroots fair trade Campaigning, which led us onto the formal AGM itself. Joanna Pollard sadly stepped down as Chair, and we welcomed Laura Cave to the Board in a non-named capacity. The main resolutions which were passed, revolve around BAFTS accepting a few more certification systems than it previously did to form part of the 70% fairly-traded goods (now 60% for shops only) which all our members (except “Associate members”) have to carry from certain specified sources. These used to be solely from BAFTS’ suppliers, WFTO, or FLO marked products and now also include Goodweave certified products (see website above), those from Fair for Life, and from WFTO Networks in the Global South.

Our Fee structure was also voted to alter slightly and these changes which come into force from 1st July 2017 can be seen on our Join BAFTS page.

As he left, Bruce Crowther, one of the founders of fair trade in that he worked to get the first ever fairtrade status for Garstang, said that he was going away inspired, so we reckon that is the icing on the cake for our Conference!!

 

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Draft Agenda and Tickets ready for BAFTS 2017 Annual Conference

We are delighted to announce the draft Agenda for our Annual Conference 2017 to all our readers, as well as the ticketing for this event via Eventbrite. The location is Priory Street Centre York and we will be joined on the Sunday evening by members of York Fair Trade Forum.

Hotels in York; Travel & Parking; Map and Location 
The venue is situated quite centrally, about 10 minutes walk from York Railway Station. It’s quite a pleasant walk (see map below). Coming by train is a good option, as the venue doesn’t have much parking directly in its grounds and parking in York is expensive generally. The venue address is 15 Priory Street, York, YO1 6ET. Tel: 01904 621133. All rooms are on the ground floor with available access for everyone. You can access a map of the area here.

Hotels have booked up quickly in the Centre of York, and it is not possible to suggest any outright. There are still some reasonably priced ones but you are advised to book very soon. Parking costs can be eased by choosing a spot and pre-booking eg via Just Park or Your Parking Space (short-term parking) where D is in Priory Street itself and can be pre-booked. Such websites have maps to enable you to work out how far you are from Priory Street itself.

You can use one of the 6 Park and Ride facilities around York and cheaper hotels in these outlying areas, depending upon which day(s) you are attending and where you are coming from. All services stop at or near to the railway station. Journeys take about 15 minutes to the City Centre. However, it seems gates are locked at 18.30 on Sundays, which is no good if you are staying for food and entertainment on the Sunday night. Parking near the venue is £2 between 6pm and 8am.

As regards booking tickets, if you are a member of the BAFTS’ Board or an invited outside speaker, you do not need to fill in a ticket for attending. Attendance is free to all, members and non-members alike. Costings including a small administration fee* from Eventbrite are based on meals required. There are five different ticketing options from £5-£15* (fee additional) depending upon which meals you intend to take on which days. There will be vegetarian food available, and you need only let our Executive Officer, Kathryn, know if you require vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free or if you have  specific allergies or other dietary requirements on membershipsupport@bafts.org.uk

Please note that the Agenda is still subject to change, although we hope to keep these to a minimum. Closer to the time, there will be a cut-off for meals as we will need to advise the caterers of numbers.

DRAFT AGENDA FOR BAFTS ANNUAL CONFERENCE YORK 2017

Sunday timetable 21st May 2017 

9am -10.30am stalls arrive and set-up ready for 10.30.

10.30 – 11.30 arrival, coffee, tea & supplier stall browsing

Exhibiting suppliers Sunday/ Monday: Traidcraft, Zuza Trading, Enfair, Zuri Design, York Scarves, Fair Grounds, Neema Crafts, Dalit Goods Company, AURA QUE, Just Trade (UK) Limited, Mixy Fandino, Kaligarh, Fair Connections.

11.30-11.40 Official welcome and order of the day

11.40-12.45 Supplier stories: three suppliers take 15 minutes to tell the story of how their work is impacting producers including a short video about the Goodweave mark.

12.45-13.45 Buffet lunch provided by El Piano.

13.45-14.30 Heather Masoud (Zaytoun) Talk on successes that Zaytoun have had eg Social Enterprise of the Year Award, new Fairtrade products coming, and how their model of trade is helping Palestinian farmers.

14.30-15.10  Carol Wills. Former BAFTS Chair, Honorary WFTO member, Voluntary Coordinator of Revised WFTO Guarantee System: Presentation on WFTO Guarantee System then Q/A

15.10-15.40 Tea and coffee break

15.40-16.45  Choice of one of three workshops to meet your needs:

                      Workshop One: Window and shop display - Silvia Rizzoli (RISC World Shop) & Daniella Cromwell     (Fair Trade at St. Michael’s, Oxford)

                      Workshop Two: Monitoring your producers: Laura Cave (Just Trade UK Ltd)

                       Workshop Three: Importing from Africa: JTS (Liam McLaughlin) with Claire                                               Shepherd Zuzu Trading; and Susan Tomes Neema Crafts.

16.45- 17.45 informal time for networking & browsing stalls.

18.00-19.00 evening meal.

19.00-21.00 - entertainment/dance workshop:Ahmed Masoud to read from his book “Vanished” and lead Palestinian dabke dancing Informal time for browsing

 

Monday timetable 22nd May 2017 

9.00 – 10.00 Supplier stalls open, tea, coffee & informal networking Additional exhibiting supplier: Picaflor

10.00 – 11.00 four supplier stories each talk for 15 minutes about the impact their work has on producers

11.00 – 11.45 Traidcraft talk by Emilie Schultze Campaigns Officer on the effect of Brexit on producers

Toilet break 11.45-11.50

11.50-12.30 Liberation Nuts talk by Amanda Galliano Business Development Manager on their progress as a Fair Trade Company 

12.30-13.30 lunch provided by Yourcafe, York

13.30-14.30 talk by Bruce Crowther (The FIG Tree Lancaster/former International fair Trade Towns Ambassador) on “Local fair trade Campaigning”  

14.30 -15.00 Discussion on Resolutions

15.00 BAFTS 2017 AGM

16.00-16.30 Close

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